wordless book

Wordless Wednesday: Mirror by Jeannie Baker

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mirrorMirror

Written & Illustrated by Jeannie Baker

Published by Candlewick on November 9, 2010
Genre/Topics: Wordless, Cultural
Ages: 6+, 48 pages 
 

Two stories and two cultures are told simultaneously in one book. The stories appear side by side as the reader turns the pages at the same time. Mirror follows a typical day of two boys on opposite sides of the world. The stories take place in Sydney, Australia, and Morocco, North Africa. An introduction is provided in English and Arabic at the start of each story. The boys awake, eat breakfast, and travel to town for errands. The left story takes place in Sydney, Australia, and the destination is a hardware store by car on roads. The right story takes place in Morocco, as the boy and his father travel by donkey on a trail to the market. The final pages display the family in Australia, with a new carpet bought on their travel and the family in Morocco, explores their new computer. The two families may appear different, but they mirror each other with common elements found in all families.

I highly enjoyed Mirror. This wordless picture book is a very unique idea how two stories are told at the same time. Mirror really provides the reader with an experience about each boy’s day in their culture. The book’s illustrations are amazing with detailed facial expressions, market foods, car license plates, animals on the trail, carpet designs, and even keyboard keys. You really feel that you are there with the families. The illustrations are photographs of collages. The detailed collages are made with many materials, such as sand, fabric, wool, tin, plastic, paint, clay, and vegetation. I read some criticism about Mirror starting it’s not easy as a read aloud in the classroom. True, it may be difficult to handle the extended pages so perhaps independent or partner reading is best. Besides, you need to examine closely to view all the details. Another criticism was that Mirror displayed cultural stereotypes. Mirror is a great book to introduce children to different lifestyles and cultures even though we share similar traits. I recommend Mirror for older ages to understand the concept and handle the book with care.

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Wordless Wednesday: Sidewalk Circus by Paul Fleischman

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Sidewalk Circus

Written by Paul Fleischman

Illustrated by Kevin Hawkes

Published by Candlewick on May 8, 2007

Ages: 5+, 32 pages

Genre/Topics: Wordless, Circus

Ladies, gentlemen, boys, and girls The Garibaldi Circus is coming to town! There are many busy preparations for the circus, but if you look closely you may get a sneak peek. A young girl watches across the street at the bus stop as people prepare for the upcoming circus. The girl witnesses a tight rope walker who is actually a construction worker balancing pails. She sees clowns who are kids skateboarding into the market. There’s a sword swallower sitting in the dentist chair. A stilt walker balances on a ladder while painting. A dog’s shadow becomes a scary lion. The entire street ‘circus’ is viewed on the last pages. The girl boards the bus at the same time a boy sits at the bus stop to watch. What exciting things will you see at the circus pre-show?

Sidewalk Circus is an entertaining book that displays ordinary street events into an exciting show. I thought it was interesting that the girl was the only individual at the bus stop who noticed the street shows. Even though this is a wordless picture book, words appear on circus posters, shops, and billboards announcing the circus. The illustrations are bright, colorful, and show city details. I recommend Sidewalk Circus to help see the extraordinary in the otherwise ordinary daily events in your city.

Wordless Wednesday: Flotsam by David Wiesner

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Flotsam
Illustrated by David Wiesner
Published by Clarion Books on September 4, 2006
Ages 5+, 40 pages
Genre/Topics: Wordless, Marine Life

Flotsam: A wreckage of a ship and its cargo found floating in the water.

A curious boy explores many animals and things at the beach. An old camera with barnacles washes onto the shore and he develops the film. He discovers interesting pictures of sea creatures: An octopus reading in the living room, seastars carry islands on their back, and even small aliens surrounded by sea horses. One photo catches his eye of a girl holding a photo who is also holding a photo. The boy zooms in the photo with his microscope and discovers many children holding the photo. He then takes a photo of himself with the photo. The camera is thrown back into the water, so more photos can be taken and other children can find it on the beach.

Flotsam is another beautifully illustrated book by David Wiesner. The book has realistic elements as he finds animals on the beach with fantasy elements of sea photos. The photo pages were outlined black in the book to appear like a photo. I only had a problem with throwing the camera back into the ocean, but I understand it’s part of the story. Remind children (and adults) to keep nature clean. Spark their wonder about sea mysteries with Flotsam.

Wordless Wednesday: Free Fall by David Wiesner

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Free Fall
Illustrated by David Wiesner
Published by HarperCollins September 18, 1991
Ages:6+, 32 pages
Genre/Topics: Wordless, Imagination
Awards: Caldecott Honor

A boy falls asleep and his adventures begin in his dreams. The book he read before bed is open and a page with a map floats away. This map appears throughout the pages on his journey. His checkered blanket becomes fields then a chess board. He battles a dragon through a forest. There’s even a Gulliver’s Travels element as the boy appears bigger and smaller at moments. He freely falls from one adventure to the next.

Free Fall is a beautifully illustrated book that truly takes the reader on adventures. After reading the book once, I slowly went back many times to view the details. The transitions from one adventure to the next occur smoothly and gradually. I recommend Free Fall for older ages to pick up story details and continue in their writing. Younger ages can also enjoy Free Fall for the illustrations. I recommend this book.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wordless Wednesday: Museum Trip by Barbara Lehman

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Museum Trip
Illustrated by Barbara Lehman
Published by HMH Books for Young Readers on May 22, 2006
Ages 4+, 32 pages
Genre/Topics: Wordless, Museum, Field Trip, Imagination

A museum holds many interesting things from paintings, artifacts, and sculptures. A young boy is on a field trip to a museum and everything is fine, until he stops to tie his shoe. He now lost his group and wanders alone. He discovers a room with maze-like drawings. When he takes a closer look he finds that he is physically inside the maze. He now explores maze after maze. When he finishes navigating through all the mazes, he exits the room. Finally, the boy catches up with his classmates on the museum trip. His field trip experience is quite different from others.

The Museum Trip is a simple wordless book and not too much imagination is needed. The book is fun, because each maze is on a page. The reader can ‘help’ the boy find the center and exit the maze.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wordless Wednesday: Journey by Aaron Becker

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journeyJourney
Illustrated by Aaron Becker
Published August 6, 2013 by Candlewick Press
40 pages, 7+
Genre/Subject: Wordless, Imagination, Travel
Awards: Caldecott Honor Book 2014
 
Journey tells the story of what can happen with a red marker and an imagination. A girl desires an adventure when she asks each family member to fly a kite, play ball, and ride a scooter. Everyone says no, so she’s bored again in her room until she notices the red marker. She draws a red door and heads out on a journey. Her red marker creates a boat, balloon, and even a flying carpet through her journey. Hopefully, her red marker helps bring her journey home.
 
I thought Journey was a delightful and colorful wordless book. There are small details you notice the second time reading. Journey can be enjoyed by all ages, but older ages can take full advantage of asking what will happen next on her journey. Children can write about what they would do if given a magic marker to take them anywhere. Journey is a fun book that will have your imagination to new places.
 

 
 

Wordless Wednesday: Wave by Suzy Lee

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Wave
Illustrated by Suzy Lee
Published April 16, 2008 by Chronicle Books
40 pages, 3+
Genre/Subject: Wordless, Beach
New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Book 2008

 Wave is the story of a young girl’s day at the beach. The girl appears with a flock of seagulls and at first she is hesitant to go into the water. The girl and seagulls are in charcoal grey on one page and the ocean waves are blue watercolors on the adjacent page. Soon the charcoal and watercolor combine as the young girl has fun in the ocean. Finally, one huge wave causes the girl to get swept away onto the shore. She leaves the beach in a blue dress as a part of the ocean always stays with her.

I thought Wave had a simple storyline, but the drawings add depth. I love how her day begins boring and grey then splashes of blue are upon her as she plays in the ocean. Wave is a good wordless picture book for younger ages, since the plot is simple. All ages will enjoy the illustrations and colors.

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