Titanic

Book Review: Eva and Little Kitty on the Titanic

Posted on Updated on

Eva and Little Kitty on the Titanic 

Written and Illustrated by Sidsel Carnahan 
Published April 23, 2012 (Presently, only available in digital format.)
Genre/Topics: Realistic Fiction, Titanic, Biography
Ages: 6-8
Pages: (I read this book on a pdf document which was 25 pages.)  
 

This is the partial true story of a Titanic survivor, Eva Hart. Eva is only seven years old when she boards the grand ship, Titanic, with her mother and father from England. Her father is very excited about their journey to America on the Titanic whereas her mother is unsure and believes something bad may happen. Eva asks if she can bring her Kitty on the ship, but is told no. However, this doesn’t stop Eva from hiding Kitty and secretly bringing the cat with her. Eva meets two young boys and she shows Little Kitty. She’s puzzled what to do about Little Kitty at night, because her mother is so worried she stays awake at night. The Captain notices Eva and asks if he can help. He states that Little Kitty can sleep in his cabin at night. One night, Eva is suddenly woken up and told to quickly dress. Her father takes Eva  to the top deck. They are told that the Titanic hit an iceberg and everyone must get into lifeboats. Eva remembers Little Kitty and hurries to the Captain’s cabin. At first, only women and children enter the lifeboats so she leaves her father behind. Eva snuggles with Little Kitty and keeps close to her mother until they are rescued.

I thought Eva and Little Kitty on the Titanic was a delightful book while also being educational. I believe this is a good introduction to the Titanic tragedy for younger ages. The story is sweet and simple as you learn about a young girl exploring the ship. I also thought it was interesting that there were different opinions within the family: the father was excited and proud to be on the Titanic, yet the mother believed nothing could be unsinkable and had negative thoughts. Although the illustrations were nice and wholesome, I wasn’t personally fond of them. The style almost appeared out-dated. However, I still enjoyed the lovely story to introduce the Titanic.

Eva Hart was one of the last remaining Titanic survivors who died at age 91. Eva Hart was very outspoken about the Titanic sinking. She  once stated: “If a ship is torpedoed, that’s war. If it strikes a rock in a storm, that’s nature. But just to die because there weren’t enough lifeboats, that’s ridiculous.”

Eva with her parents
 
 
 
 
Advertisements

Book Review: Polar the Titanic Bear

Posted on Updated on

Polar: The Titanic Bear

Written by Daisy Corning Stone Spedden 
Introduction by  Leighton H. Coleman III
Illustrated by Laurie McGaw 
Published September 1, 1994 by Madison Books
Ages: 7+, 64 pages 
Genre/Topics: Nonfiction, Titanic, Scrapbook, Photos
 

Polar: The Titanic Bear is a fascinating true story told from the bear’s perspective. The story was written by the boy’s mother, Daisy Corning Stone Spedden. The story along with family photographs was  discovered in the attic by Leighton H. Coleman III who is a distant cousin to Daisy. She presented the story to her son, Douglas or “Master” as he’s called in the story, on Christmas in 1913. The bear was manufactured in Germany and shipped to F.A.O. Schwartz in New York City.  The boy quickly fell in love with the bear and named him “Polar”. The Spedden family was very wealthy and traveled around the world. Master took Polar everywhere with him. A few places they traveled to were Paris, Panama, Bermuda, and Northern Africa. Master kept Polar near when he was sick with the measles. He even included Polar during tea parties with friends. Finally, they were going to return to America on the Titanic. Master held Polar close in the lifeboat. As everyone was being rescued out of small lifeboats and onto the Carpathia, Polar was almost forgotten until sailors noticed the bear. The entire family safely made it across the Atlantic Ocean.

I enjoyed Polar: The Titanic Bear as it provided a snapshot into the privileged Edwardian-American society. The book is a little long for a read aloud, but it includes many family photographs, postcards, and other mementoes. I think adults will also enjoy this unique book. Sadly, Douglas died only three years after surviving the Titanic disaster. He was only nine years old in one of the first recorded car accidents in the state of Maine. Nobody is certain what happened to Polar the bear. The Speddens continued to travel, but had no more children. The Titanic adventure doesn’t begin until about the middle of the book.

Douglas with his parents, Polar is at his feet.
Douglas and his mother on the beach in Bermuda.
Douglas and his father in the hotel garden.

Related Articles: 

http://www.polarthetitanicbear.com/Polar_The_Titanic_Bear/About.html

Book Review: Titanic #1: Unsinkable

Posted on Updated on

Titanic #1: Unsinkable 

Written by Gordon  Korman
Published May 1, 2011 by Scholastic Paperbacks
Genre/Topics: Historical Fiction, Titanic, Adventure 
Ages: 8+, 176 pages 
 

This is the first book in a series of three about the Titanic’s maiden voyage. The book switches perspectives to four young characters who eventually all meet abroad the Titanic. Paddy is a stowaway who is running away from danger. Alfie is a junior crew member who lied about his age to work on Titanic. Juliana is travelling with her father, a wealthy Earl, who is often drunk and gambling. Sophie travels with her mother who campaigns for women’s rights and was arrested. In this book, Unsinkable, there is great excitement as the gigantic RMS Titanic Ship is about to set sail for the first time and is supposedly unsinkable. The book is a quick read and ends with a cliff hanger. Luckily, all the books are published so you can read the entire series.

RMS Titanic departing Southampton on April 10,...
RMS Titanic departing Southampton on April 10, 1912 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Book Review: Pig on the Titanic

Posted on Updated on

Pig on the Titanic: A True Story 

Written by Gary Crew
Illustrated by Bruce Whatley 
Published March 1, 2005 by Harper Collins Publishers
Genre/Topics: Nonfiction, Titanic 
Ages: 7+, 32 pages 

 

This is a cute book from the perspective of a musical box-shaped like a pig named Maxixe. Maxixe’s owner was Miss Edith Rosenbaum who was a fashion buyer abroad the Titanic. Her mother bought the musical box as a good luck charm and to brighten her mood with music. The pig played the maxixe which was a popular dance during that time period. Miss Edith took Maxixe everywhere on the Titanic. When the Titanic hit the iceberg she held the pig close. She wasn’t going to get into a lifeboat until a sailor mistook her pig in a bundle for a baby and threw it into a lifeboat. Miss Edith jumped into the lifeboat. Maxixe helped brighten the children’s spirit in the lifeboat as they wound up the tail and listened to music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edith and her pig, Maxixe.