Hermione

Hermione Experiences Censorship

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Today’s the last day of banned books week, however our freedom to read should be celebrated all year. I was going to end the week with my favorite series and well-known for being challenged, of course I’m referring to the Harry Potter series. Instead, I decided to use a past post about Harry Potter.

Any student found in possession of the magazine ,The Quibbler, will be expelled.

For some reason, every time Hermione caught sight of one of these signs she beamed with pleasure.

‘What exactly are you so happy about?’ Harry asked her.

‘Oh, Harry don’t you see?’ Hermione breathed. ‘If she could have done one thing to make absolutely sure that every single person in this school will read your interview, it was banning it!’

– J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, page 512)

I don’t think this conversation spoils the book if you haven’t read it yet. The basic idea is that the magazine, The Quibbler, provided information that the ministry didn’t want students to know about. Of course, Hermione catches this action right away and understands that students will now learn the truth. By the end of the day, every student read The Quibbler.

What happens when you ban or forbid something? Of course, our curiosity wins and we desire to seek what others don’t want us to learn or comprehend. Individuals crave to know what information and context is so terrible and extreme that some want to influence others from not reading it. So don’t be afraid to read the book, listen to the song, or watch the movie that others find ‘questionable’ or ‘inappropriate’. My personal philosophy is that any book worth banning is a book worth reading.

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‘The Quibbler’ excites Hermione

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Any student found in possession of the magazine The Quibbler will be expelled.

For some reason, every time Hermione caught sight of one of these signs she beamed with pleasure.

‘What exactly are you so happy about?’ Harry asked her.

‘Oh, Harry don’t you see?’ Hermione breathed. ‘If she could have done one thing to make absolutely sure that every single person in this school will read your interview, it was banning it!’

– J.K. Rowling (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, page 512)

I remembered this small conversation between Harry and Hermione from Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix after yesterday’s post about censorship in The Day They Came to Arrest the Book. (Yes, I’ve read them enough times to recall certain phrases.) I don’t think this conversation spoils the book if you haven’t read it yet. The basic idea is that the magazine, The Quibbler, provided information that the ministry didn’t want students to know about. Of course, Hermione catches this action right away and understands that students will now learn the truth. By the end of the day, every student read The Quibbler.

What happens when you ban or forbid something? Of course, our curiosity wins and we desire to seek what others don’t want us to learn or comprehend. I know this sounds wrong, but perhaps the best business for an author is for their work to become challenged or banned. Think about it. Individuals crave to know what information and context is so terrible and extreme that some want to influence others from not reading it. So don’t be afraid to read that material, listen to the song, or watch the movie that others find ‘questionable’ or ‘inappropriate’ to themselves. My personal philosophy is that any book worth banning is a book worth reading.

The page number refers to the adult version. I still remember when I bought this ‘adult’ book. I was in Europe at the time when Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix released, so I somehow wanted to get my hands on it. Finally, I found the book in Amsterdam and was asked ‘Would you like the adult or children’s version?’. Well, in the United States I’ve only heard of one version and I thought to myself: ‘Hmm, what exactly makes Harry Potter ‘adult’ material?’ So of course, my curiosity won and I bought the ‘adult’ version. I learned the only difference was the font and cover, supposedly to encourage adult readers and not being caught reading Harry Potter. Personally, I think these covers appear darker as the series should be portrayed. However, as I mentioned in an earlier post, you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover.

Adult Version                                                     Children’s Version