fantasy

Writing 101 Challenge: The Lost Room

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Prompt: ‘Imagine you had a job in which you had to sift through forgotten or lost belongings. Describe a day in which you come upon something peculiar or interesting you find in a pile.’

Lost Room

You must have a valid invitation to enter.

Emma looked at the somewhat ordinary piece of paper in her hands. It was plain white with a typed message:

You lost something important. Go to the listed location open weekly 8AM-6PM. Please remember that there is no attendant or anyone to assist you. It is your responsibility to locate your lost item. This invitation is for only your eyes. You may not mention this experience to anyone. Enter code 1X2R5BW9

Good luck on your search!

Emma stood at the entrance to the lost room and laughed. She didn’t even know what she exactly lost, but was curious after receiving the ‘official invitation’ in the mail. It was actually stupid to be here, since there could be a murderer behind the door. She pushed in the code and waked inside the lost room.

The room was extremely organized. There were endless shelves with labeled boxes of numerous sizes. She scanned a few shelves and boxes. Emma was at a complete loss, because she didn’t know what she lost. She started to scan a few shelves and boxes.

An entire shelf was dedicated to lost keys with boxes labeled: house, car, locker, jewelry box, and even ‘keys to success’. Another shelf was organized by photos with boxes labeled: wedding, class pictures, reunion, summer, Christmas, Thanksgiving, etc with a year and location. Another shelf was dedicated to kitchen items with boxes labeled: spoons, teacups, grandma’s gravy boat, wine glasses, etc. The rows of shelves of lost items continued until she reached the last shelf. The last shelf was slightly different, because it didn’t contain lost items that an individual could hold in your hand. This shelf had boxes labeled lost: humor, love, adventure, confidence, life, etc.

Emma stood still and confused. What exactly was lost in her life? She had all her keys, family heirlooms, and even kept photo books. Why did she receive this special invitation to this unique room? Did others receive a similar invitation? She would never know, since she couldn’t talk about this experience. Emma walked again down the last row.

She opened the box labeled ‘lost humor’ and heard laughter and saw many paper slips with jokes, photos, funny moments, and even weird objects. It made her smile and laugh. No, she didn’t lose her sense of humor.

She opened the box labeled ‘lost adventure’. There were photos of sail boats, mountains, bikes, animals, hot air balloons, parachutes, a movie set, her hometown at night, a farm, delicious foods, and even a photo of Earth. Emma paused and thought. She knew her life had too much routine and she never tried anything new. She decided that she lost her sense of adventure. Emma closed her eyes and picked a photo. She decided this would be her next adventure in life.

She picked a photo of the pyramids. It wasn’t the first place she thought about, but it would sure be an adventure. She was off to Egypt. Emma found her lost adventure.

What would you find in the lost room?

 

 

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Book Review: The BFG by Roald Dahl

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BFGThe BFG

Written by Roald Dahl 
Illustrated by Quentin Blake 
Published in 1982
Genre/Topics: Humor, Fantasy
Ages: 6+, 212 pages 

 

Most people don’t even think giants exist and those that do are usually very afraid of them. However, the Big Friendly Giant or the BFG doesn’t want to hurt anyone. Sophie is an orphan who first meets the BFG while looking out her window at night. The BFG notices and reaches through her window to take her away, since nobody would believe her if she said she saw a giant. Soon Sophie realizes that the BFG is friendly and has no plans to eat her, instead he was out at night putting dreams with his long trumpet into children’s ears. It’s not always pleasant, because the BFG is the smallest among other giants who desire to eat human beans every night. When the large and revolting giants are out eating human beans, the BFG captures dreams and stores thousands into jars. Sophie learns where the giants plan to find their next meal and the BFG and her form a plan to stop them before it’s too late. 

The BFG has all the standard humor, fun, and zany words that are unique to Roald Dahl. So far I haven’t been disappointed by one of his books. I’m sure you’ll wish you also knew a giant, well at least a friendly one.

Book Review: Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks

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Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend imaginary
Written by Matthew Dicks
Published by St. Martin’s Press on March 1, 2012
Genre/Topic: Adult Fiction, Fantasy 
311 pages 

 

Three Word Review: Unique, Imaginative, Suspense

Budo is Max’s imaginary friend who always sticks near his side. Budo is unique, because he appears human-like and has been around for 5 years when most imaginary friends die in kindergarten. Max himself is unique, because he has a form of Asperger’s Syndrome which is why Budo is such a great companion. Budo likes most of Max’s teachers, but he doesn’t like Mrs. Patterson who works in the Learning Center who supposedly knows what’s best for Max. Mrs.Patterson performs a terrible situation with Max. Budo communicates with other imaginary friends to help Max even if your friend may no longer believe.

I enjoyed this book, because it was a unique perspective and makes us wonder if we remember any imaginary friends and how the silent guidance helped us.

 

Book Review: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

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night circusThe Night Circus
 
Written by Erin Morgenstern
Published by Doubleday on September 13, 2011 
Genre: Adult Fiction, Fantasy
387 pages 
 

 

Throw away any previous ideas about what you know about the circus. This circus appears with no warning and only operates at night.  No bold colors appear inside the circus tents, instead everything contains shades of black, white, and grey. Welcome guests to Le Cirque des Rêves or The Circus of Dreams. Dreams are indeed what individuals see and experience when they enter the circus. However, the circus is much more than just a circus. It is a grand stage where a game is played between two players, Celia and Marco. They have been trained by masters their entire life without any knowledge about what exactly the game is and who their competitor is. Previously anything that seemed impossible is now possible with Celia and Marco’s fantasies. There are many unique individuals working within the circus who help keep the circus alive. Soon everything changes from a game into more a collaboration as Celia and Marco’s magical fantasies play together without truly knowing the other.

I absolutely loved The Night Circus. I could almost smell the caramel popcorn and imagine myself stepping into each new circus tent filled with wonder. Morgenstern writes with such detail that her descriptions seem to come alive from the page. Normally, I’m not somebody who believes a good book should become a movie, but I believe The Night Circus  would be quite magical to view all the circus’ fantasies. I instantly wanted to reread The Night Circus to experience the circus again. If you’re able to let your imagination run free and like travelling to new places then you may enjoy The Night Circus. I’m glad my last book in 2012 was such a pleasure.

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

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The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe 

Written by C. S. Lewis 
Read by Michael York
Originally published on October 16, 1950
Published by Harper Audio
Genre: Adventure, Fantasy 
Audio Edition: 4 hours, 22 minutes
Ages: 8+, 208 pages 
 

Welcome to the land of Narnia. There are two methods to read The Chronicles of Narnia: either by the date published or chronically order. I decided to read the series in the order C.S. Lewis first published them, so The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe makes it the first book. We meet Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie for the first time.

To avoid bombs during World War II in  London, the four Pevensie children live with a wealthy professor in the country. The house is large and mysterious. It is during a game of hide and seek that Lucy discovers Narnia through the wardrobe. Next Edmund journeys into Narnia and meets the Queen. Soon all four children magical enter the world of Narnia.

The White Witch has cast an evil spell that makes it always winter.  The children begin an adventure quest to remove the Witch. Aslan the brave lion slowly takes back power as winter melts away. The children find themselves in the center of a prophecy when two sons of Adam and two daughters of Eve return to Narnia to eliminate the White Witch.

They meet talking animals and mythical creatures in the land of Narnia. I won’t address C.S. Lewis’ Christian themes, but The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a wonderful start for all ages. Please join me as I read the entire series.

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Book Review: Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator

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Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator 

Written by Roald Dahl 
Read by Eric Idle 
Published on August 12, 1972 by Knopf Books for Young Readers 
Audio Edition Published July 6, 2004 by Harper Festival
Ages: 8+, 176 pages
Audio Edition: 3 hours and 30 minutes 
Genre: Fantasy 
 

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator picks up right where Charlie and the Chocolate Factory concludes. Charlie has won the chocolate factory prize and is now in the glass elevator with his entire family. Inside the great glass elevator are Charlie, Mr. Willy Wonka, Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine, Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina, and Mr. and Mrs. Bucket. They are riding high into space. Along the way, they encounter Vermicious Knids, Gnoolies, a space hotel, a strange communication with the President of the United States, unique vitamins that increase and decrease your age, and more crazy adventures with Mr. Willy Wonka. I enjoyed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory more, but you’re in for another delightful Roald Dahl treat with this book.

 
 
 

Book Review: The Phantom Tollbooth

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The Phantom Tollbooth 

by Norton Juster

Fantasy

Ages 12 & up, 272 pages

Milo is a bored boy who believes everything is a waste of time and there’s nothing to do until he finds a package with a note that states: “For Milo, who has plenty of time”. He jumps in the car and travels through the tollbooth to begin an eventful journey. He meets a watchdog, Tock, who travels with him to Dictionopolis, the city of words, near the Sea of Knowledge where letters are sold and people eat their words. Milo meets the Sound Keeper who files away all sounds in the Valley of Sound. Milo learns that Princess Rhyme and Princess Reason were banned from Wisdom. He journeys to Digitopolis where numbers are mined and jewels are meaningless. Milo’s on a quest to save the Princesses and bring peace between King Azaz, the unabridged ruler of Dictionopolis, and Mathemagician, ruler of Digitopolis. During Milo’s adventures, he learns that life isn’t dull and is full of possibilities. I thought this was a wonderful book that has hints of Alice in Wonderland. The Phantom Tollbooth is a unique fantasy book that has humor, but also makes the reader think that time is valuable and life is full of wonders.

So many things are possible just as long as you don’t know they’re impossible.
― Norton Juster (The Phantom Tollbooth)