Among the Free

Book Review: Among the Free (Shadow Children #7)

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Among the Free (Shadow Children #7) 

Written by Margaret Peterson Haddix
Published by Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers on April 25, 2006 
Genre/Topics: Science Fiction, Adventure, Dystopia, Political
Ages: 10+, 208 pages 
 

*potential spoilers*

Among the Free is the final book in the Shadow Children series. At first I thought the title itself was a spoiler, since it states  that individuals are ‘free’. However, the title isn’t at all a spoiler. In this previous books of the Shadow Children series, the reader gains insight into the hardships of third children remaining hidden and who exactly to trust when actions take place. Also, there are different lead characters to gain perspectives. I was very pleased that Luke was the focus character just as it started in book one, Among the Hidden. It was as though the series came in full circle. In Among the Free, Luke is still in the Population Police as he attempts to remain out of sight however they select him for a group activity where he closely works with the Population Police. Events occur when Luke defies orders and runs away from the Population Police. Eventually, Luke stumbles into a village where he soon learns that the Population Police are no longer in power and everyone is free. Luke is skeptical and doesn’t believe the freedom that he views on television, so he travels to the headquarters himself. He indeed does find individuals rejoicing and chanting about freedom. However, conflict and disagreements occur when individuals cannot decide how to reform the government. There is chaos when individuals overuse their new freedom. Are the individuals truly free from the Population Police? What do people desire in their government? Is it possible for citizens to even agree?

I thought Among the Free‘s main plot tackles major political issues. It shows how citizens react to drastic government changes. This book can be used in social studies classrooms while teaching about real life situations in the news with government power conflicts. Unlike the previous books, there’s really no violence in Among the Free. The plot is quite complex and younger ages may not fully understand.

When I first read the Shadow Children series I wasn’t expecting to write a review for each book. I enjoyed the new story idea  and how the characters handled their situations. I’m actually surprised that Amazon lists this series ages eight and up, because the concepts are complex and there is some violence in the books. However, age isn’t a defining factor for whether a book is appropriate for a child. I suggest to read this series.

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