American Library Association

Celebrate Library Card Sign-Up Month!

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September is National Library Sign-up Month. Oh I’ve had a city library card for years, which I frequently use. Yesterday, I received my library card for my entire county. Hopefully, I’ll get books faster on two waiting lists. There were two women in front of me also getting library cards that sparked the excitement even more. I simply presented my driver’s license as proof of residency and I was given my new magical library card. Of course it’s magical since it has so many uses. I probably picked the card geared for children, yet it made me smile and states ‘I’m a born reader!’. My fingers glided over the simple plastic card and I smiled as I thought of the possibilities.

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How do I get a library card?

You need to present a current photo ID and proof residency. Some libraries grant temporary cards for students and visitors. Children 14 and younger can also receive a library card with a parent/guardian signature.

What can I do at the library?

  1. Get to know your librarian, the ultimate search engine @ your library.
  2. Update your Facebook page.
  3. Research new job opportunities.
  4. Find a list of childcare centers in your area.
  5. Learn about local candidates for office.
  6. Pick up voter registration information.
  7. Check out your favorite graphic novel.
  8. Pick up a DVD.
  9. Get wireless access.
  10. Participate in a community forum.
  11. Find out how to navigate the Internet.
  12. Prepare your resume.
  13. Get new ideas for redecorating your house.
  14. Get a list of community organizations.
  15. Attend a lecture or workshop.
  16. Hear a local author reading his/her latest novel.
  17. Join a book discussion group.
  18. Attend preschool story hour with your child.
  19. Get homework help.
  20. Look up all kinds of health information.
  21. Research the purchase of a new car.
  22. Trek to another planet in a Sci-Fi novel.
  23. Call the reference desk if you have a question.
  24. Research your term paper.
  25. Learn about the history or your city or town.
  26. Decide which computer to buy using a consumer guide.
  27. Check your stock portfolio.
  28. Read a newspaper from another country.
  29. Borrow or download an audiobook for your next road trip or commute.
  30. Use the library’s resources to start a small business.
  31. See a new art exhibit.
  32. Volunteer as a literacy tutor.
  33. Find a new recipe.
  34. Ask for a recommended reading list for your kids.
  35. Make photocopies.
  36. Get a book from interlibrary loan.
  37. Enroll your child in a summer reading program.
  38. Take a computer class.
  39. Hear a poetry reading.
  40. Take out the latest fashion magazine.
  41. Enjoy a concert.
  42. Trace your family tree.
  43. Check out a special collection of rare books.
  44. Check out a legal question or issue.
  45. Find out how to file a consumer complaint.
  46. Learn about home improvement.
  47. Borrow some sheet music.
  48. Learn how to use a database or computerized catalog.
  49. Find the latest romance paperback.
  50. Pick up tax forms.
  51. Connect with other people in the community.
  52. Find a quiet spot, curl up with a book and enjoy.

Many of these activities don’t require a library card, so you can still participate. These are just a few ideas to fully use your library!

Check out these sites to learn more about how to get the most from your library.

http://www.ilovelibraries.org/

http://atyourlibrary.org/

http://www.ala.org/ (American Library Association)

My Library Card is Valuable Because…

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September is a fabulous month for libraries. (Every month is a wonderful month for libraries.) September is library card sign-up month. American Library Association along with other organizations are promoting the library and obtaining a library card. Individuals submit a photo of themselves or with family and show why your library card is so important. Along with the photo the individual states why their library card is so valuable. There will then be a random drawing and a lucky individual will win a Target gift card (U.S. residents only). Adults, children, and even the family dog can be in the photo as long as the library is somehow promoted. Click HERE to submit a photo.

Young Adult is for All Readers

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I found this newspaper article from  ilovelibraries.org about young adult books. I love the library and I’ll admit that I don’t scan the YA section as much as I should. I don’t like to put books into age groups, since many can be enjoyed by different ages. For example, Harry Potter mania has been read by both genders to grandparents to young children. Young adult books offer a wide range of topics, such as peer pressure, drugs, coming-of-age, relationship struggles, bullying, school conflicts, biographies, society issues, adventure, and so  many wonderful new life experiences. There has been debate that YA books may be graphic, bold, and too mature for readers. Well, life isn’t perfect and many individuals deal with these issues on a daily basis. Reading helps us understand how we fit into society. Books help us understand ourselves. Reading YA books as a parent or teacher can also help you understand those teens around you. So, next time you’re unsure about which book to read next stroll over to the Young Adult section. You may be pleasantly surprised about what you found. I promise to take a closer look too.

Selected Young Adult Books:

The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne-Collins
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Looking for Alaska by John Green 
The View from Saturday by E. L. Konigsburg   
Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Monster by Walter Dean Myers
The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier 
The Maze Runner Trilogy by James Dashner
Forever by Judy Blume 
Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles
The Secret Year by Jennifer Hubbard
 

What Young Adult books do you suggest?

 
American Library Association’s 2011 Best Young Adult Book List  

Amazon’s Essential Young Adult Books

 

Book Smorgasbord

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Walk into a buffet restaurant and you’ll  find many choices. Grab a plate and pile on your favorite dishes. We’ll pretend that calories don’t count and you have a bottomless stomach for this meal. Select your meats whether it’s roast beef, spicy sausage, meatballs, or barbeque chicken. Perhaps you’re a vegetarian who doesn’t select a meat choice. Continue through the buffet to find pizza, french fries, fruits, vegetables, and even jello. Of course we need room for delicious desserts, such as cookies, berry cobbler, and ice cream. Finish your selections and head to your table to compare your choices with friends. You may see food on a friend’s plate that you didn’t notice at the buffet. Maybe you make a sour face to a food you dislike on someone’s plate. Perhaps you snitch food from others. Buffets often change weekly, so each visit is new.

Instead of a restaurant, you’re now walking into any library, bookstore, school, or garage sale with discount paperbacks. Maybe you decide to ‘walk’ into your Amazon account from the comfort of your home. Depending on the location, your ‘plate’ today is a library card, wallet, school pass, loose change, and most important an open mind. Everyone has different ‘tastes’ when we select books to read. There are endless ‘dishes’ from mystery, romance, science fiction, biography, contemporary fiction, non-fiction, graphic novels, picture books, reference books, magazines, journals, newspapers, history, foreign language, poetry, best sellers, photography, travel, geography, audio books, religion, how-to books, and much more. There’s even subcategories for each book ‘dish’. You can ‘travel’ to different countries with books about its food, landmarks, transportation, geography, historical aspects, and more to fully ‘explore’ the location. Similar to a buffet, you don’t need to select every book. Also, you don’t need to have the same book ‘taste’ preference  as your friends. However, friends can always share ‘dish’ recommendations about which books to read next time. Of course, new books are stocked so numerous trips need to be taken to satisfy your ‘hunger’ for books to read.

Banned books week is next week, however we need to celebrate book diversity all year. Individuals should have the freedom to read anything they desire without criticism from others. I’m not going to forbid you from picking a book I dislike. Nobody should have the right for books to be removed from classrooms, schools, and libraries. Often individuals don’t even read the material before deciding if it should be banned. You never know, you may learn something new or gain an appreciation for different perspectives. We all have different book tastes, so allow others to enjoy their choices without judgement. Experience the diverse flavors of a book smorgasbord.

Dare to think for yourself.

– Voltaire

Information about banned books week:

banned books week.org

American Library Association (ALA) information about banned books

YouTube Banned Books Channel

Children’s Book Newbery Medal

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A Newbery Medal Winner is a children’s book given each year by the American Library Association. One book is picked that had a great contribution to American children’s literature for that year. Honor books were also picked as ‘runner-ups’.

The message states: “To encourage original creative work in the field of books for children. To emphasize to the public that contributions to the literature for children deserve similar recognition to poetry, plays, or novels. To give those librarians, who make it their life work to serve children’s reading interests, an opportunity to encourage good writing in this field.”

My original goal for this blog was to report each Newbery Medal winner, since 1922. And that turns into a lot of books, however I’ll still strive to read and report each of these books.

http://www.ala.org/ala/awardsgrants/index.cfm

Here’s a list of the Newbery Medal winners to give a quick look. Which medal winners have you read?

2011: Moon over Manifest by Clare Vanderpool (Delacorte Press, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books)
2010: When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead (Wendy Lamb Books, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books)
2009: The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, illus. by Dave McKean (HarperCollins)
2008: Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! Voices from a Medieval Village by Laura Amy Schlitz (Candlewick)
2007: The Higher Power of Lucky by Susan Patron, illus. by Matt Phelan (Simon & Schuster/Richard Jackson)
2006: Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins (Greenwillow Books/HarperCollins)
2005: Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata (Atheneum Books for Young Readers/Simon & Schuster)
2004: The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread by Kate DiCamillo (Candlewick Press)
2003: Crispin: The Cross of Lead by Avi (Hyperion Books for Children)
2002: A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park(Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin)
2001: A Year Down Yonder by Richard Peck (Dial)
2000: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis (Delacorte)
1999: Holes by Louis Sachar (Frances Foster)
1998: Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse (Scholastic)
1997: The View from Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg (Jean Karl/Atheneum)
1996: The Midwife’s Apprentice by Karen Cushman (Clarion)
1995: Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech (HarperCollins)
1994: The Giver by Lois Lowry(Houghton)
1993: Missing May by Cynthia Rylant (Jackson/Orchard)
1992: Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (Atheneum)
1991: Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli (Little, Brown)
1990: Number the Stars by Lois Lowry (Houghton)
1989: Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices by Paul Fleischman (Harper)
1988: Lincoln: A Photobiography by Russell Freedman (Clarion)
1987: The Whipping Boy by Sid Fleischman (Greenwillow)
1986: Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan (Harper)
1985: The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley (Greenwillow)
1984: Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary (Morrow)
1983: Dicey’s Song by Cynthia Voigt (Atheneum)
1982: A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Poems for Innocent and Experienced Travelers by Nancy Willard (Harcourt)
1981: Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson (Crowell)
1980: A Gathering of Days: A New England Girl’s Journal, 1830-1832 by Joan W. Blos (Scribner)
1979: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin (Dutton)
1978: Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson (Crowell)
1977: Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor (Dial)
1976: The Grey King by Susan Cooper (McElderry/Atheneum)
1975: M. C. Higgins, the Great by Virginia Hamilton (Macmillan)
1974: The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox (Bradbury)
1973: Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George (Harper)
1972: Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O’Brien (Atheneum)
1971: Summer of the Swans by Betsy Byars (Viking)
1970: Sounder by William H. Armstrong (Harper)
1969: The High King by Lloyd Alexander (Holt)
1968: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg (Atheneum)
1967: Up a Road Slowly by Irene Hunt (Follett)
1966: I, Juan de Pareja by Elizabeth Borton de Trevino (Farrar)
1965: Shadow of a Bull by Maia Wojciechowska (Atheneum)
1964: It’s Like This, Cat by Emily Neville (Harper)
1963: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle (Farrar)
1962: The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare (Houghton)
1961: Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell (Houghton)
1960: Onion John by Joseph Krumgold (Crowell)
1959: The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare (Houghton)
1958: Rifles for Watie by Harold Keith (Crowell)
1957: Miracles on Maple Hill by Virginia Sorensen (Harcourt)
1956: Carry On, Mr. Bowditch by Jean Lee Latham (Houghton)
1955: The Wheel on the School by Meindert DeJong (Harper)
1954: …And Now Miguel by Joseph Krumgold (Crowell)
1953: Secret of the Andes by Ann Nolan Clark (Viking)
1952: Ginger Pye by Eleanor Estes (Harcourt)
1951: Amos Fortune, Free Man by Elizabeth Yates (Dutton)
1950: The Door in the Wall by Marguerite de Angeli (Doubleday)
1949: King of the Wind by Marguerite Henry (Rand McNally)
1948: The Twenty-One Balloons by William Pène du Bois (Viking)
1947: Miss Hickory by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey (Viking)
1946: Strawberry Girl by Lois Lenski (Lippincott)
1945: Rabbit Hill by Robert Lawson (Viking)
1944: Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (Houghton)
1943: Adam of the Road by Elizabeth Janet Gray (Viking)
1942: The Matchlock Gun by Walter Edmonds (Dodd)
1941: Call It Courage by Armstrong Sperry (Macmillan)
1940: Daniel Boone by James Daugherty (Viking)
1939: Thimble Summer by Elizabeth Enright (Rinehart)
1938: The White Stag by Kate Seredy (Viking)
1937: Roller Skates by Ruth Sawyer (Viking)
1936: Caddie Woodlawn by Carol Ryrie Brink (Macmillan)
1935: Dobry by Monica Shannon (Viking)
1934: Invincible Louisa: The Story of the Author of Little Women by Cornelia Meigs (Little, Brown)
1933: Young Fu of the Upper Yangtze by Elizabeth Lewis (Winston)
1932: Waterless Mountain by Laura Adams Armer (Longmans)
1931: The Cat Who Went to Heaven by Elizabeth Coatsworth (Macmillan)
1930: Hitty, Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field (Macmillan)
1929: The Trumpeter of Krakow by Eric P. Kelly (Macmillan)
1928: Gay Neck, the Story of a Pigeon by Dhan Gopal Mukerji (Dutton)
1927: Smoky, the Cowhorse by Will James (Scribner)
1926: Shen of the Sea by Arthur Bowie Chrisman (Dutton)
1925: Tales from Silver Lands by Charles Finger (Doubleday)
1924: The Dark Frigate by Charles Hawes (Little, Brown)
1923: The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle by Hugh Lofting (Stokes)
1922: The Story of Mankind by Hendrik Willem van Loon (Liveright)

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/newberymedal/newberywinners/medalwinners.cfm