ALA

Young Adult is for All Readers

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I found this newspaper article from  ilovelibraries.org about young adult books. I love the library and I’ll admit that I don’t scan the YA section as much as I should. I don’t like to put books into age groups, since many can be enjoyed by different ages. For example, Harry Potter mania has been read by both genders to grandparents to young children. Young adult books offer a wide range of topics, such as peer pressure, drugs, coming-of-age, relationship struggles, bullying, school conflicts, biographies, society issues, adventure, and so  many wonderful new life experiences. There has been debate that YA books may be graphic, bold, and too mature for readers. Well, life isn’t perfect and many individuals deal with these issues on a daily basis. Reading helps us understand how we fit into society. Books help us understand ourselves. Reading YA books as a parent or teacher can also help you understand those teens around you. So, next time you’re unsure about which book to read next stroll over to the Young Adult section. You may be pleasantly surprised about what you found. I promise to take a closer look too.

Selected Young Adult Books:

The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne-Collins
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Looking for Alaska by John Green 
The View from Saturday by E. L. Konigsburg   
Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Monster by Walter Dean Myers
The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier 
The Maze Runner Trilogy by James Dashner
Forever by Judy Blume 
Perfect Chemistry by Simone Elkeles
The Secret Year by Jennifer Hubbard
 

What Young Adult books do you suggest?

 
American Library Association’s 2011 Best Young Adult Book List  

Amazon’s Essential Young Adult Books

 

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Book Smorgasbord

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Walk into a buffet restaurant and you’ll  find many choices. Grab a plate and pile on your favorite dishes. We’ll pretend that calories don’t count and you have a bottomless stomach for this meal. Select your meats whether it’s roast beef, spicy sausage, meatballs, or barbeque chicken. Perhaps you’re a vegetarian who doesn’t select a meat choice. Continue through the buffet to find pizza, french fries, fruits, vegetables, and even jello. Of course we need room for delicious desserts, such as cookies, berry cobbler, and ice cream. Finish your selections and head to your table to compare your choices with friends. You may see food on a friend’s plate that you didn’t notice at the buffet. Maybe you make a sour face to a food you dislike on someone’s plate. Perhaps you snitch food from others. Buffets often change weekly, so each visit is new.

Instead of a restaurant, you’re now walking into any library, bookstore, school, or garage sale with discount paperbacks. Maybe you decide to ‘walk’ into your Amazon account from the comfort of your home. Depending on the location, your ‘plate’ today is a library card, wallet, school pass, loose change, and most important an open mind. Everyone has different ‘tastes’ when we select books to read. There are endless ‘dishes’ from mystery, romance, science fiction, biography, contemporary fiction, non-fiction, graphic novels, picture books, reference books, magazines, journals, newspapers, history, foreign language, poetry, best sellers, photography, travel, geography, audio books, religion, how-to books, and much more. There’s even subcategories for each book ‘dish’. You can ‘travel’ to different countries with books about its food, landmarks, transportation, geography, historical aspects, and more to fully ‘explore’ the location. Similar to a buffet, you don’t need to select every book. Also, you don’t need to have the same book ‘taste’ preference  as your friends. However, friends can always share ‘dish’ recommendations about which books to read next time. Of course, new books are stocked so numerous trips need to be taken to satisfy your ‘hunger’ for books to read.

Banned books week is next week, however we need to celebrate book diversity all year. Individuals should have the freedom to read anything they desire without criticism from others. I’m not going to forbid you from picking a book I dislike. Nobody should have the right for books to be removed from classrooms, schools, and libraries. Often individuals don’t even read the material before deciding if it should be banned. You never know, you may learn something new or gain an appreciation for different perspectives. We all have different book tastes, so allow others to enjoy their choices without judgement. Experience the diverse flavors of a book smorgasbord.

Dare to think for yourself.

– Voltaire

Information about banned books week:

banned books week.org

American Library Association (ALA) information about banned books

YouTube Banned Books Channel