adventure

Book Review: Among the Impostors (Shadow Series #2)

Posted on Updated on

Among the Impostors (Shadow Children #2) 

Written by Margaret Peterson Haddix
Published by Aladdin on December 21, 2001 
Genre/Topics: Science Fiction, Adventure, School Hazing 
Ages: 10+, 172 pages 
 
 

For the first time in Luke’s life he is no longer hiding with the help of a fake I.D. He’s enrolled at Hendricks School for Boys where he must attempt to blend in, because if he’s discovered as a third child the Population Police may kill him. As soon as Luke arrives at Hendricks there is constant teasing and hazing from other classmates. Luke doesn’t know where his classes are, sits alone, and often must follow the orders from others. He begins to get homesick and whispers his name, since now he is Lee Grant. Luke cannot tell the students apart, gets lost in hallways, and doesn’t understand why the school has no windows. One day while wondering the halls Luke notices an unlocked door to the outside. Will Luke have the courage to understand the secrets at Hendricks?

I enjoyed Among the Impostors perhaps even more than Among the Hidden. There are new situations, problems, and characters for the reader to discover. The book surprised me even when I thought I knew what was happening. I’m ready to read the third book in the Shadow series.

Advertisements

Book Review: Among the Hidden (Shadow Series #1)

Posted on Updated on

Among the Hidden (Shadow Children #1) 

Written by Margaret Peterson Haddix
Published by  Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers on September 1, 1998
Genre/Topics: Science Fiction, Dystopia, Adventure
Age: 10+, 153 pages 
Book Awards: Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award Nominee (2002),Sunshine State Young Readers Award for Grades 6-8 (2001), ALA’s Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults (1999)
 

Luke has never gone to school, left his house, or met any other individual beside his family. He lives in the attic and cannot even look out windows. Luke is a third child who lives in the shadows. He must remain hidden, because he lives in a society where there can only be two children. If a third child or anyone attempting to hide a third child is discovered then the Population Police can punish by death. One day while peeking through the attic vents he notices a face in the neighbor’s window. Is it another third child who must stay hidden? How will Luke respond to the face?

I really enjoyed this book, because it had an interesting and unique plot. It contains government context and perhaps mature ideas. The book ended on a great cliffhanger and I’m ready to read the next book in the series.

Book Review: Titanic #1: Unsinkable

Posted on Updated on

Titanic #1: Unsinkable 

Written by Gordon  Korman
Published May 1, 2011 by Scholastic Paperbacks
Genre/Topics: Historical Fiction, Titanic, Adventure 
Ages: 8+, 176 pages 
 

This is the first book in a series of three about the Titanic’s maiden voyage. The book switches perspectives to four young characters who eventually all meet abroad the Titanic. Paddy is a stowaway who is running away from danger. Alfie is a junior crew member who lied about his age to work on Titanic. Juliana is travelling with her father, a wealthy Earl, who is often drunk and gambling. Sophie travels with her mother who campaigns for women’s rights and was arrested. In this book, Unsinkable, there is great excitement as the gigantic RMS Titanic Ship is about to set sail for the first time and is supposedly unsinkable. The book is a quick read and ends with a cliff hanger. Luckily, all the books are published so you can read the entire series.

RMS Titanic departing Southampton on April 10,...
RMS Titanic departing Southampton on April 10, 1912 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Posted on Updated on

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe 

Written by C. S. Lewis 
Read by Michael York
Originally published on October 16, 1950
Published by Harper Audio
Genre: Adventure, Fantasy 
Audio Edition: 4 hours, 22 minutes
Ages: 8+, 208 pages 
 

Welcome to the land of Narnia. There are two methods to read The Chronicles of Narnia: either by the date published or chronically order. I decided to read the series in the order C.S. Lewis first published them, so The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe makes it the first book. We meet Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie for the first time.

To avoid bombs during World War II in  London, the four Pevensie children live with a wealthy professor in the country. The house is large and mysterious. It is during a game of hide and seek that Lucy discovers Narnia through the wardrobe. Next Edmund journeys into Narnia and meets the Queen. Soon all four children magical enter the world of Narnia.

The White Witch has cast an evil spell that makes it always winter.  The children begin an adventure quest to remove the Witch. Aslan the brave lion slowly takes back power as winter melts away. The children find themselves in the center of a prophecy when two sons of Adam and two daughters of Eve return to Narnia to eliminate the White Witch.

They meet talking animals and mythical creatures in the land of Narnia. I won’t address C.S. Lewis’ Christian themes, but The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a wonderful start for all ages. Please join me as I read the entire series.

Related articles:

Book Review: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Posted on Updated on

Hatchet 

Written by Gary Paulsen 
Read by Peter Coyote 
Originally Published by Aladdin on January 1, 1987 
Ages: 10+, 208 pages 
Audio Review: 3 hours, 42 minutes 
Audio Edition: Published by Listening Library on April 27, 2004
Topics: Survival, Adventure
 

On a trip to visit his recently divorced father, thirteen year old Brian Robeson is the only survivor in the small single engine plane crash after the pilot has a heart attack. After the pilot dies, Brian steers the plane as best as he can and lands inside the Canadian wilderness. The only items he has for survival are his clothes and the newly bought hatchet from his mother. Brian faces many challenges as he braves the wildness alone to survive. In order to survive, Brain must stay physically and emotionally strong. He often has flashbacks about his parent’s recent divorce, which is painful because he feels he wouldn’t be in this situation if his parents were still together. Brian knows that if he is going to survive the wilderness then he needs to think positive. His personality changes as he becomes more patient and corrects previously made mistakes. Brian gains patience as he learns to closely watch and think before making any quick and reckless actions. He learns skills to fish, start a fire, build a shelter, and defend himself. Hatchet is the first book in the Brian Saga series. Gary Paulsen won a Newbery Honor Award for Hatchet.

I enjoyed listening to this audio version of Hatchet. Peter Coyote’s voice was clear and provided emotion during the reading. There was sometimes music and sound effects during suspenseful moments. Some readers may become disinterested, since Brian is the only character for most of the book and there is no real conversation. However, Hatchet kept my interest as Brian encountered challenges for survival.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Ready

Posted on Updated on

This week’s official photo challenge topic is ready. A few summers ago, my family and I went on a cruise to Alaska. The best highlight was our dog sled adventure. We rode in a helicopter and viewed amazing sights of Alaskan mountains and glaciers.  We were all ready for an exciting adventure!

This is a photo from above that shows the many dogs and dog igloos.

The dogs appear somewhat calm in the photo, but they were sooo excited to get ready to pull the sled.

The dogs looked so cute in their little booties.

When everything was ready then the dogs were finally happy and could run. You could either sit in the sled or stand. I tried both. The whole experience on the sled lasted about thirty minutes, but it was awesome! It was so thrilling, I’m ready to do it again!

Book Review: The 39 Clues Series

Posted on Updated on

The 39 Clues Series
Written by Rick RiordanGordon KormanPeter LerangisJude WatsonPatrick Carman, Linda Sue Park , Margaret Peterson Haddix 
Published: 2008-2010 by Scholastic 
Ages: 9 + Genre: Adventure, Mystery, Suspense 
 

I’m surprised it took me so long to discover the exciting adventures in The 39 Clues. I’ve only read the first book, but I think it has potential for an exciting series. When a relative dies, Dan and Amy Cahill are given the opportunity to take a million dollars or take the first clue that leads them on dangerous hunt to discover the source of the family’s power. Dan and Amy are practically like orphans, since their parents died when they were young and their old aunt hires au pairs. I enjoyed this book for several reasons. The perspectives switch between Dan and Amy, so both boys and girls can view themselves on the hunt for clues. There is a strong and positive sibling connection as they work together, but there’s still humor and normal teasing between brother and sister. The 39 Clues explores secrets and knowledge from the past, since the Cahill family has been powerful throughout history. Readers learn about historic events and important individuals, such as Benjamin Franklin, without being boring. The first book, The Maze of Bonesliterally was a cliff hanger that gets you ready for the next book.

The books themselves are great, but the reader becomes more involved through online interactions and collecting trading cards. You become an agent and attempt to solve clues. One thing I didn’t like was that you needed to put the card’s code that came with the book to gain further access online. Well, I didn’t have a card since I read the book from the library. Individuals sort themselves into the Cahill family with a mini quiz. I’m on the Ekaterina branch. Another great thing about this series is that it’s written by multiple authors. The hope is that readers will discover new authors to enjoy after reading The 39 Clues. 

www.the39clues.com

www.scholastic.com/teachthe39clues

tout