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Who Do You Write Like?

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Derek McFadden

I know, it’s a strange title. But it’s a question I get a lot (my high school English teacher would bristle at that use of a lot: “A lot is a place where a house is built, ladies and gentlemen!”). Often. It’s a question I get often. There. Much better.

Some people write mysteries. Others write thrillers. Suspense, perhaps. Then there’s literary fiction, where the use of language is almost more important than what that language actually says.

There are so many different genres—YA (young adult), magical realism, fantasy (which differs slightly from the broad sci-fi designation)–that to pigeonhole a writer into one, and only one, is not fair to them. Yet it’s done all the time.

I write stories I would want to read. I think every writer does. Mine do tend to land in the fantasy genre (though rarely, if ever, do they contain mythological creatures).

A…

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9/11 Book: September Roses

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Children's Books & More

September Roses illustrated and written by Jeanette Winter

Ages 5 – 8, 40 pages (Very short book with about a sentence on each page with beautiful pictures)

As September 11th approaches, I wanted to highlight some children’s books that can be used to discuss the topic.

September Roses is a true story about two sisters from South Africa who grow roses. They traveled with over 2,000 roses to New York City for a flower show. Due to the attack on the World Trade Centers, the flower show cancelled and the sisters weren’t able to travel back to South Africa. So, they had no where to go and boxes of unused roses. However, there was a suggestion for how to use the roses. The sisters formed two towers of roses that helped others during this tragic situation.

The book does a good job lightly explaining what occurred without giving too much…

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9/11 Book: September 12th Everything Would Be All Right

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Children's Books & More

September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right

by Materson Elementary Students in Kennett, Missouri

Ages 5-7, 32 pages

The horrible acts on September 11, 2001, created questions about what and how to explain the events to young children. September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right is different because first grade students themselves wrote the book. It is a simple book that discusses that ordinary things still occur, such as homework, story time, and 2+2=4. The message is of hope that even after bad things occur that each day is a new beginning. It briefly discuss what occurred, so it’s not very graphic.

 

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