Library

Celebrate Library Card Sign-Up Month!

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September is National Library Sign-up Month. Oh I’ve had a city library card for years, which I frequently use. Yesterday, I received my library card for my entire county. Hopefully, I’ll get books faster on two waiting lists. There were two women in front of me also getting library cards that sparked the excitement even more. I simply presented my driver’s license as proof of residency and I was given my new magical library card. Of course it’s magical since it has so many uses. I probably picked the card geared for children, yet it made me smile and states ‘I’m a born reader!’. My fingers glided over the simple plastic card and I smiled as I thought of the possibilities.

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How do I get a library card?

You need to present a current photo ID and proof residency. Some libraries grant temporary cards for students and visitors. Children 14 and younger can also receive a library card with a parent/guardian signature.

What can I do at the library?

  1. Get to know your librarian, the ultimate search engine @ your library.
  2. Update your Facebook page.
  3. Research new job opportunities.
  4. Find a list of childcare centers in your area.
  5. Learn about local candidates for office.
  6. Pick up voter registration information.
  7. Check out your favorite graphic novel.
  8. Pick up a DVD.
  9. Get wireless access.
  10. Participate in a community forum.
  11. Find out how to navigate the Internet.
  12. Prepare your resume.
  13. Get new ideas for redecorating your house.
  14. Get a list of community organizations.
  15. Attend a lecture or workshop.
  16. Hear a local author reading his/her latest novel.
  17. Join a book discussion group.
  18. Attend preschool story hour with your child.
  19. Get homework help.
  20. Look up all kinds of health information.
  21. Research the purchase of a new car.
  22. Trek to another planet in a Sci-Fi novel.
  23. Call the reference desk if you have a question.
  24. Research your term paper.
  25. Learn about the history or your city or town.
  26. Decide which computer to buy using a consumer guide.
  27. Check your stock portfolio.
  28. Read a newspaper from another country.
  29. Borrow or download an audiobook for your next road trip or commute.
  30. Use the library’s resources to start a small business.
  31. See a new art exhibit.
  32. Volunteer as a literacy tutor.
  33. Find a new recipe.
  34. Ask for a recommended reading list for your kids.
  35. Make photocopies.
  36. Get a book from interlibrary loan.
  37. Enroll your child in a summer reading program.
  38. Take a computer class.
  39. Hear a poetry reading.
  40. Take out the latest fashion magazine.
  41. Enjoy a concert.
  42. Trace your family tree.
  43. Check out a special collection of rare books.
  44. Check out a legal question or issue.
  45. Find out how to file a consumer complaint.
  46. Learn about home improvement.
  47. Borrow some sheet music.
  48. Learn how to use a database or computerized catalog.
  49. Find the latest romance paperback.
  50. Pick up tax forms.
  51. Connect with other people in the community.
  52. Find a quiet spot, curl up with a book and enjoy.

Many of these activities don’t require a library card, so you can still participate. These are just a few ideas to fully use your library!

Check out these sites to learn more about how to get the most from your library.

http://www.ilovelibraries.org/

http://atyourlibrary.org/

http://www.ala.org/ (American Library Association)

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My Library Card is Valuable Because…

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September is a fabulous month for libraries. (Every month is a wonderful month for libraries.) September is library card sign-up month. American Library Association along with other organizations are promoting the library and obtaining a library card. Individuals submit a photo of themselves or with family and show why your library card is so important. Along with the photo the individual states why their library card is so valuable. There will then be a random drawing and a lucky individual will win a Target gift card (U.S. residents only). Adults, children, and even the family dog can be in the photo as long as the library is somehow promoted. Click HERE to submit a photo.

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I discovered that this post from last year received almost 300 views just today! I thought I’d reblog the post since it’s library card sign up month!

Children's Books & More

I absolutely, positively love my library. Yes, I have my library card number memorized and can state exactly when it’s open. This little card is your passport to endless knowledge.

The library opens up so many possibilities to individuals and the community. It’s a shame that so many libraries in the United States faced with economic troubles have closed. My own city closed two libraries. It is during challenging times that individuals most use their public library. The library provides résumé workshops, job search tutorials, technology support, guest speaker seminars, research on computers, and much more. It’s a safe place where individuals interact with the community and gain information. At the library you can learn a new language, listen to audio books, sample new music, complete homework, catch up on the latest DVDs, attend book readings, participate in summer reading programs, listen to story hour, socialize during teen activities, watch…

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Book Review: Lola at the Library

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Lola at the Library 

Written by Anna McQuinn
Illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw 
Published April 4, 2006 by Charlesbridge Publishing
Topics: Reading, Library, Books
Ages: 2+, 32 pages 
 

Every Tuesday, Lola and her mommy visit the library. She carefully puts all her books in her backpack to return. Lola enjoys spending time in the children’s area  where she listens to stories and songs. After storytime, Lola takes her time and picks new books to check out. When Lola and her mommy are finished checking out books they get a snack after visiting the library. Before bed, Lola’s mommy reads a library book to her.

Lola at the Library is a simple and sweet story about a young girl visiting the library. The book is a great introduction about the library. It takes many trips to the library for children to become comfortable, feel safe, and most importantly desire to come back. Now that I’m an adult it sometimes feels weird if I didn’t make my weekly library visit! Thanks Mom! 🙂

Celebrate National Library Week!

April 8-14, 2012

Book Review: Calico Cat Meets Bookworm

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Calico Cat Meets Bookworm

written & illustrated by Donald Charles

Ages 4-6, 31 pages

This is the story about Calico Cat who has nothing to do until he meets Bookworm who introduces the wonder of books and the library. The book explores different stories that Calico Cat enjoys, such as stars, sailing ships, far away lands, clowns, and trains. Bookworm explains all those stories and more can be found at the library. Calico Cat Meets Bookworm was published in 1978, so people may not be aware of this book. My copy from the library was in the main stacks that wasn’t checked out often. I think this is a shame, because it’s a simple book that gets to the heart of books and reading. The last page gives a check list how to use the library: I know where the easy books are kept. I am quiet and orderly. I handle books with care. I know how to borrow and return books. You’ll probably have to buy this book through an outside seller, such as on ebay or half priced books. Cross your fingers that your library has the book.

Amelia Bedelia is a Bookworm

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Amelia Bedelia, Bookworm

by Herman Parish, illustrated by Lynn Sweat

Ages 5 – 7, 63 pages

The Amelia Bedelia book series describes a housekeeper who takes everything too literal and gets herself into mix-ups. In this book, Amelia Bedelia volunteered at the library but not everything went according to plan. She misheard the librarian and thought all the children received a bookmark, but actually the librarian stated: “Here’s your book, Mark.” She helped children with book reports and created bookmarks, but she got herself in trouble when she stole the bookmobile. I thought this was a delightful read and excites children about using the library and reading books. Besides, who doesn’t want to be a bookworm?

“Excuse me,” said a girl. “I need some help, too. I am looking for a thesaurus.” 
“The Saurus?” said Amelia Bedelia. “What kind of dinosaur is that?”
“I’m not sure,” said the girl. “Is a thesaurus a dinosaur? My teacher said I needed one to do my report.”
“Gee,” said Amelia Bedelia, “you are way too late. Every Saurus died millions of years ago.”
“What am I going to do now?” said the girl. 
 

– Herman Parish (Amelia Bedelia, Bookworm)