Ages 4-6

Book Review: It’s Spring!

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springIt’s Spring!

Written by Linda Glaser,
Illustrated by Susan Swan
Published January 1, 2002 by Millbrook Press 
Genre/Topics: Seasons, Nature, Realistic
Ages: 4+, 32 pages 

 

It’s Spring! is a colorful and educational book about how the season changes to Spring. The book follows one boy as he experiences different things during Spring.  It begins how winter coats are no longer needed, the ice melts and then there are puddles to jump in. The different senses are in the book as he feels  the soft buds on his cheek, hears birds cheep, and smells daffodils. Spring is now the season to plant and he starts a garden. He notices that the sun shines longer and the days are warmer. The illustrations are very unique, because it’s made with three-dimensional cut paper then layered to give depth and photographed with lights to give shadows. The pictures almost appear as though the flower is popping out of the page. The back of the book provides Spring nature activities. 

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Happy 1st Day of Spring!

 

Book Review: Leaf Man

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Leaf Man Leaf Man

Written & Illustrated by Lois Ehlert
Published by Harcourt Children’s Books on September 1, 2005 
Genre/Topics: Season, Environment, Science 
Ages: 3+, 40 pages 
ALA Notable Children’s Book  

 

 

Leaf Man is a colorful book that describes a leaf’s journey. The leaves begin joined together as a ‘man’, but then the wind blows it in all directions. Instead of stating leaves blowing, the book states it as though it was a leaf man travelling. The wind blew the leaf man over vegetable gardens, over meadows, flowing along a river, and flying over mountains with birds. Each page the leaves formed into the descriptions, such as leaves attached to become fish-like when it traveled along the river. Throughout the book it states ‘a Leaf Man’s got to go where the wind blows’. The pages are die cut that together create a landscape. The author collected actual leaves then made the illustrations to closely resemble the leaves. On the back, there are pictures of each leaf and its name. I really enjoyed Leaf Man.

 

This photo shows the die cuts on the top of each page. Think of each landscape element as a different page.

 

 

 

Book Review: Fletcher and the Falling Leaves

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Fletcher and the Falling Leaves 

Written by Julia Rawlinson 
Illustrated by Tiphanie Beeke 
Published by Greenwillow Books on August 29, 2006 
Genre/Topics: Seasons
Ages: 4+, 32 pages 

 

It is no longer summer in the forest as the green colors are slowly turning brown.Fletcher is worried about his favorite tree that now appears brown and dry.  Fletcher tells his mother that he thinks his tree is sick, but she says that the tree is fine and that’s it’s now autumn. However, the tree doesn’t appear better at all as more leaves fall. He attempts to attach a leaf to the tree, but the wind carries it away. Soon the tree is completely bare and Fletcher notices that other forest animals use the leaves to provide warmth or build a nest. He takes the last leaf home and protects it. When Fletcher returns to his favorite tree he discovers that the once bare tree contains icicles. Fletcher is happy when he sees the beautiful tree.

 

9/11 Book: September 12th Everything Would Be All Right

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Children's Books & More

September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right

by Materson Elementary Students in Kennett, Missouri

Ages 5-7, 32 pages

The horrible acts on September 11, 2001, created questions about what and how to explain the events to young children. September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right is different because first grade students themselves wrote the book. It is a simple book that discusses that ordinary things still occur, such as homework, story time, and 2+2=4. The message is of hope that even after bad things occur that each day is a new beginning. It briefly discuss what occurred, so it’s not very graphic.

 

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Back to School Book: Butterflies in My Stomach

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Butterflies in My Stomach and Other School Hazards 

Written & Illustrated by Serge Bloch 
Published  by Sterling on August 5, 2008
Genre/Topics: First Day of School, Humorous, Idioms
Ages: 4+, 32 pages 

The first day of school brings many emotions from excitement to nerves. This is a book to hopefully ease those butterflies in your stomach before you begin school. We’ve all heard unique speech expressions that don’t need an explanation, such as ‘it’s raining cats and dogs’, ‘cat caught your tongue’, ‘the early bird gets the worm’, ‘tickled pink’, ‘apple of my eye’, and many more. However, as children these expressions can be very confusing especially on the first day of school when you’re already nervous.

A child begins his first day of school and feels awful from the start when he wakes on ‘the wrong side of the bed’ and almost missed the bus which would cause him to be ‘in a real pickle’. The teacher tried to ease his worries stating that he was ‘all ears’ when he was ready to talk then read a funny book which had students ‘laughing their head off’. He visits the school librarian and learns that you can ‘get lost in a book’. He hopes to play outside at recess, yet everybody must come inside because ‘it’s raining cats and dogs’, but the boy is sad because he doesn’t see his dog from the sky. The story concludes with the boy arriving at home and greeting his dog, which made him feel as ‘happy as a puppy with two tails’.

I really enjoyed this book. There are a total of thirty-five idioms throughout the book. You can play a game to find all the idioms and then see who can explain them. It’s amazing how idioms make each language unique. The illustrations are great, because most of the book is simple black and white but the highlighted idiom is in color. I highly suggest this book for the first day of school or whenever you want a good laugh.

 

Book Review: Chopsticks

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Chopsticks

Chopsticks
Written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
Illustrated by Scott Magoon
Published by Hyperion Books on January 24th 2012
Genre/Topics: Humorous, Friendship, Be Yourself 
Ages: 4-8, 40 pages 
 
Chopsticks were best friends who were always together and did everything together. Nobody could remember a time when they weren’t together. However, something tragic occurred when they attempted new skills together. Chopstick was whisked away for help. and luckily it was a clean break, so Chopstick would soon be better. Chopstick stayed next to Chopstick each day until somebody mentioned that it was time to move on and try new things without Chopstick. Soon Chopstick learned new talents without his friend. Finally, Chopstick was better and together they learned that being apart actually made them stronger yet they still remained great friends. 
 
I really enjoyed Chopsticks and it made me laugh as I read it. It’s a wonderful book to teach young children that it’s okay to work together, but also be apart. There are no pronouns (he/she) in the book, so the name Chopstick is used for both.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Book Review: The Frog Prince Continued

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The Frog Prince Continued

Written by Jon Scieszka
Illustrated by Steve Johnson
Published May 1, 1991 by Puffin 
Genre/Topics: Humor, Alternative Fairy Tale 
Ages: 6+, 32 pages 
 

I  love Jon Scieszka’s book The True Story of the Three Little Pigsso I had high expectations for The Frog Prince Continued. I was not disappointed as I laughed throughout the book. There is a unique twist on “happily ever after”, ever since the Frog Prince kissed the Princess. She’s also not happy, since his tongue always sticks out, she finds lily pads in his pockets, and he leaps everywhere. So the Frog Prince begins a journey looking for a witch to turn him back into a frog. He meets interesting characters along his journey such as a witch who wants him to finish eating an apple, but he knows his fairy tales and doesn’t eat it. Then he meets a witch with a gingerbread house who is expecting Hansel and Gretel soon. Finally, the Frog Prince returns home to discover that the Princess was worried about him. She kissed his lips and both turned into frogs and together they lived happily ever after.