snow

Weekly Quote: C.S. Lewis

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A children’s story that can only be enjoyed by children is not a good children’s story in the slightest.

- C.S. Lewis

Snowflakes melt fast.

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Originally posted on Living Life in Glorious Colour:

I tried my new macro lens the other day. It started to snow and I tried to capture the flakes. The weather however, was not cold enough. The flakes were melting quickly. Here are my first attempts at capturing snow in the lens. I know others have succeeded with  beautiful images. This is my start.

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Weekly Quote: J. K. Rowling

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If you don’t like to read you haven’t found the right book.

- J. K. Rowling

Weekly Photo Challenge: Simple

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This week’s photo challenge is simple. A winter blast hit the Pacific Northwest earlier this week. I live about forty minutes south of Seattle, so whenever snow is on the forecast that’s all they talk about. Here are some simple black and white photos with snow and ice. True the whole process of water into ice is complex, but I wanted to share.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Peaceful

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This week’s photo challenge is peaceful and the first thing that came into my mind was silence, alone, and still. I was going to post a lovely sunset photo, but I decided to share photos I took in Alaska. My family and I experienced a helicopter ride above Alaskan glaciers and mountain range. The view was breathtaking. The scenery appeared so majestic and tranquil. The black and white photos really capture the stillness.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Winter

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I haven’t posted a weekly photo challenge for a few weeks, since I’ve been busy with the holidays but I’ve found winter photos. I’ve already posted a few of these, but I still enjoy them. Bundle up and stay warm.

Here is frost on my car window on a cold winter morning.

 

Science & Wonder of Snow

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The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter’s Wonder 

by Mark Cassino with Jon Nelson

Nonfiction, Science

Ages 8 & up, 36 pages

This is a wonderful book for all ages to understand in clear language about how exactly snow forms. It’s a process that occurs at a miniature  scale, so our eyes don’t witness the wonder. The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter’s Wonder provides snow crystal photographs, diagrams about the steps to become a snow crystal, and how to catch your own snowflakes in the correct conditions. The book clearly explains the snow formation process without being too confusing. After learning about the science of snow, I wished that it was cold and snowy to catch snowflakes. Sadly, I had no snow. This book is a great addition to an earlier book review about Wilson Bentley who learned how to photograph snow in the 1880s in the book Snowflake Bentley. The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter’s Wonder was recognized by the National Science Teacher’s Association in 2010.

Would you like to catch your own snow crystals? Here are some steps to help you see beautiful snow crystals. I haven’t personally tried this, but let me know if your results are successful.

Supplies: 
- Dark & stiff cardboard or foam
- Magnifying glass 
 
Directions: 
1. Put the cardboard of foam outside for at least 10 minutes before trying to catch snow. The board must stay cold and dry. 
2. Hold the board by one edge so that it is flat. Position yourself so that only a few snowflakes fall on the board. 
3. Examine smaller bits of snow to see individual snow crystals. Use the magnifying glass. 
4. Keep trying and make sure the board remains cold.