September 11th

9/11 Book: September 12th Everything Would Be All Right

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Originally posted on Children's Books & More:

September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right

by Materson Elementary Students in Kennett, Missouri

Ages 5-7, 32 pages

The horrible acts on September 11, 2001, created questions about what and how to explain the events to young children. September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right is different because first grade students themselves wrote the book. It is a simple book that discusses that ordinary things still occur, such as homework, story time, and 2+2=4. The message is of hope that even after bad things occur that each day is a new beginning. It briefly discuss what occurred, so it’s not very graphic.

 

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9/11 Book: Heroic Fireboat

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Originally posted on Children's Books & More:

Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey by Maira Kalman

Ages 6 -9, 48 pages

This is the inspiring true story of the John J. Harvey-a retired New York City fireboat reinstated on September 11, 2001. Originally launched in 1931, the Harvey was the most powerful fireboat of her time. After the September 11 attacks, with fire hydrants at Ground Zero inoperable and the Hudson River’s water supply critical to fighting the blaze, the fire department called on the Harvey for help.

The book provides brief history of events during Harvey’s prime in the 1930s. The pictures are beautiful and provide a unique story during a tragic event. It briefly explains what occurred without going into too much detail. The focus is upon the community’s involvement that creates a discussion about everyone’s role and the importance of coming together.

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Book Review: Thunder Dog

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Thunder Dog: A Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero

by Michael Hingson and Susy Flory

Nonfiction, 256 pages

Thunder Dog is a book about a blind man’s relationship with his guide dog, Roselle, and how they escaped together from the Twin Towers. Michael Hingson was born blind and throughout the entire book you learn how this never stopped him , but pushed him forward. Forward is also the first command that a guide dog learns. Hingson calmly travels down the hundreds of stairs with his faithful dog at all times. Thunder Dog provides descriptions from events on September 11th, but I wouldn’t say it’s the only focus. The book goes back and forth from Hingson growing up in a sighted world to the long journey down the stairs. He discusses the relationship with his guide dogs, discrimination he encountered, resources that helped him, and his constant determination. If you’re searching for a book that’s only focused on 9/11 with detailed descriptions then this is the wrong book. (Previous review: 102 Minutes is a better choice.) However, if you’re looking for a book with heart that focuses on one individual during a moment of hope then this is your book.

Here are some Guide Dog Wisdom from the book:

What I learned from Roselle on 9/11

1. There’s a time to work and a time to play. Know the difference. When the harness goes on, it’s time to work. Work hard; others are depending on you.
2. Focus in and use all of your senses. Learn to tell the difference between a harmless thunderstorm and a true emergency. Don’t let your sight get in the way of your vision.
3. Sometimes the way is hard, but if you work together, someone will pass along a water bottle just when you need it.
4. Always, but always, kiss firefighters.
5. Ignore distractions. There’s more to life than playing fetch or chasing tennis balls.
6. Listen carefully to those who are wiser and more experienced than you. They’ll help you find the way.
7. Don’t stop until work is over. Sometimes being a hero is just doing your job.
8. The dust cloud won’t last forever. Keep going and look for the way out. It will come.
9. Shake off the dust and move on. Remember the first guide dog command? “Forward.”
10. When work is over, play hard with your friends.

Michael Hingson (Thunder Dog, page 173)

Book Review: 102 Minutes to Survive the Twin Towers

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102 Minutes: The Untold Story of the Fight to Survive Inside the Twin Towers

by Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn

384 pages

I shared 9/11 recommendations for children’s book, so I’ll include a nonfiction book that I finished. 102 Minutes was the first book I read about the events on September 11th. I think this book did a great job providing emotion while also giving facts and details. The book constantly referred to the horrific circumstances similar to those on the Titanic, since it wasn’t just the iceberg that killed the people. The authors discussed in detail about building codes that changed when building the Twin Towers and the inside struggles the individuals encountered, such as stairways blocked, doors locked, and elevators not working. The authors used first hand information from interviews, phone calls, emails, radio communication, and emergency contacts. Individuals had only 102 minutes from the time the first tower was hit to when both towers collapsed. Exact times were given throughout the book. There also were diagrams of the Twin Towers showing exactly where each plane hit, stairways blocked, and exit paths. The book provided emotion, such as details about individuals who risked their life to help others and people working together to survive. I highly recommend this book for a deeply moving experience about the events on September 11th. I finished the book in two days.

9/11 Book: September 12th Everything Would Be All Right

Posted on Updated on

September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right

by Materson Elementary Students in Kennett, Missouri

Ages 5-7, 32 pages

The horrible acts on September 11, 2001, created questions about what and how to explain the events to young children. September 12th: We Knew Everything Would Be All Right is different because first grade students themselves wrote the book. It is a simple book that discusses that ordinary things still occur, such as homework, story time, and 2+2=4. The message is of hope that even after bad things occur that each day is a new beginning. It briefly discuss what occurred, so it’s not very graphic.

 

9/11 Book: Dog Heros of September 11th

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Dog Heroes of September 11th: A Tribute to America’s Search and Rescue Dogs

by Nona Kilgore Bauer, photographs  by Isabelle Francais

Nonfiction, 232 pages

Dog Heroes of September 11th isn’t a children’s book, but it’s a new perspective on the event. The book gives tribute to dogs and their handlers during moments after September 11, 2001. There are 78 dogs featured in the book with wonderful photographs and descriptions about their jobs. Being a search and rescue dog takes a lot of training and long hours yet these dogs love their work.  Many of these dogs received medals  for their service.  A search and rescue dog’s work is often indispensable during missions where people can’t fully complete the job. I think people will enjoy this book, because dogs relate to people at a personal level during difficult situations.

 

9/11 Book: Heroic Fireboat

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Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey by Maira Kalman

Ages 6 -9, 48 pages

This is the inspiring true story of the John J. Harvey-a retired New York City fireboat reinstated on September 11, 2001. Originally launched in 1931, the Harvey was the most powerful fireboat of her time. After the September 11 attacks, with fire hydrants at Ground Zero inoperable and the Hudson River’s water supply critical to fighting the blaze, the fire department called on the Harvey for help.

The book provides brief history of events during Harvey’s prime in the 1930s. The pictures are beautiful and provide a unique story during a tragic event. It briefly explains what occurred without going into too much detail. The focus is upon the community’s involvement that creates a discussion about everyone’s role and the importance of coming together.