Roald Dahl

Weekly Quotation: Roald Dahl

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“If you have good thoughts, they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.”

– Roald Dahl

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Book Review: The BFG by Roald Dahl

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BFGThe BFG

Written by Roald Dahl 
Illustrated by Quentin Blake 
Published in 1982
Genre/Topics: Humor, Fantasy
Ages: 6+, 212 pages 

 

Most people don’t even think giants exist and those that do are usually very afraid of them. However, the Big Friendly Giant or the BFG doesn’t want to hurt anyone. Sophie is an orphan who first meets the BFG while looking out her window at night. The BFG notices and reaches through her window to take her away, since nobody would believe her if she said she saw a giant. Soon Sophie realizes that the BFG is friendly and has no plans to eat her, instead he was out at night putting dreams with his long trumpet into children’s ears. It’s not always pleasant, because the BFG is the smallest among other giants who desire to eat human beans every night. When the large and revolting giants are out eating human beans, the BFG captures dreams and stores thousands into jars. Sophie learns where the giants plan to find their next meal and the BFG and her form a plan to stop them before it’s too late. 

The BFG has all the standard humor, fun, and zany words that are unique to Roald Dahl. So far I haven’t been disappointed by one of his books. I’m sure you’ll wish you also knew a giant, well at least a friendly one.

Book Review: The Witches

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The Witches

Written by Roald Dahl
Illustrated by Quentin Blake
Published by Puffin Books on January 1, 1983
Genre/Topics: Humorous, Fantasy
Ages: 8+, 208 pages 

 

The Witches is another wonderful book by Roald Dahl that is sure to delight many readers. The story begins with a young boy who is orphaned when his parents die in a terrible car accident. In their will, the boy is to be cared for by his Norwegian grandmother who is an expert at how to identify witches. She explains that witches are not what people typically think, such as they don’t wear black hats or ride broomsticks. His grandmother states that witches instead appear like ordinary women with ordinary jobs. This is a witch’s motto: One child a week is fifty-two a year, Squish them and squiggle them and make them disappear. Throughout the book, the boy learns more about how to distinguish a witch from a normal woman. His grandmother and him stay at a hotel during the summer and this is when the fun really begins. He had a pet mouse that he tried to teach tricks well the hotel manager was very upset to have a mouse running around. The boy sneaked into an empty room that stated ‘Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children’, so it must be a safe place to train his pet mouse. Suddenly women enter the room and he soon learns that they are actually not normal women at all, but witches. I’ll let you discover what happens next.

I highly enjoyed this Roald Dahl book. I believe even adults will get a laugh. The book had me guessing what would happen next and if the boy could save the day.

Weekly Quote: Roald Dahl

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I have a passion for teaching kids to become readers, to become comfortable with a book, not daunted. Books shouldn’t be daunting, they should be funny, exciting and wonderful; and learning to be a reader gives a terrific advantage.

― Roald Dahl

Book Review: Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator

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Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator 

Written by Roald Dahl 
Read by Eric Idle 
Published on August 12, 1972 by Knopf Books for Young Readers 
Audio Edition Published July 6, 2004 by Harper Festival
Ages: 8+, 176 pages
Audio Edition: 3 hours and 30 minutes 
Genre: Fantasy 
 

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator picks up right where Charlie and the Chocolate Factory concludes. Charlie has won the chocolate factory prize and is now in the glass elevator with his entire family. Inside the great glass elevator are Charlie, Mr. Willy Wonka, Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine, Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina, and Mr. and Mrs. Bucket. They are riding high into space. Along the way, they encounter Vermicious Knids, Gnoolies, a space hotel, a strange communication with the President of the United States, unique vitamins that increase and decrease your age, and more crazy adventures with Mr. Willy Wonka. I enjoyed Charlie and the Chocolate Factory more, but you’re in for another delightful Roald Dahl treat with this book.

 
 
 

Weekly Quote: Magic with Roald Dahl

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And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it.

- Roald Dahl

Book Review: The Twits

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The Twits 

by Roald Dahl, illustrated by Quentin Blake

Ages 8+, 96 pages

Fantasy & Humor

Mr. and Mrs. Twit are the ugliest, dirtiest,  and smelliest people in the world. Mr. Twit has a very hairy beard that he never cleans and everything attaches onto the hairs. Mrs. Twit has the ugliest face ever, because she constantly has ugly thoughts. At the start of the book, Mr. and Mrs. Twit try to out revenge each other. Mrs. Twit uses her glass eye to watch Mr. Twit, but then he puts a frog in her bed. However, similar to other Dahl books the revenge slowly turns onto the ugly and dirty Twits. I thought this was a fun book with gross humor that I’m sure many will get a laugh.

If a person has ugly thoughts, it begins to show on the face. And when that person has ugly thoughts every day, every week, every year, the face gets uglier and uglier until it gets so ugly you can hardly bear to look at it.

A person who has good thoughts cannot ever be ugly. You can have a wonky nose and a crooked mouth and a double chin and stick-out teeth, but if you have good thoughts they will shine out of your face like sunbeams and you will always look lovely.

Nothing good shone out of Mrs. Twit’s face.

- Roald Dahl (The Twits, page 9)