Foto Friday: Splish Splash

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George in the water

Kalaloch Beach, 2013

Book Review: When a Pet Dies by Fred Rogers

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petWhen a Pet Dies
Written by Fred Rogers 
Photographs by Jim Judkis 
Published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons 1988 
Genre/Topics: Realistic, Death, Pets
Ages: 3-6, 32 pages
Death is a hard time period for all individuals, especially children who may have difficulties understanding exactly what death means. The first death experience a child may have is when a dear pet dies in their family. When a Pet Dies begins slowly and discusses how pets are part of the family and take great care. The book explains that sometimes their pet gets sick and needs a pet doctor or veterinarian. However, sometimes their pet is too old, sick, or injured for anyone to cure. Many people may gently explain to children that death is going to sleep for a long time, but When a Pet Dies explains that when a pet dies it isn’t alive so it can’t wake up. The book explains how people handle death differently. It’s okay to feel upset, cry, or desire to be alone. The important thing is to remember that there are loved ones who care about how you feel about losing your pet. When a Pet Dies finishes that with time you will no longer feel sad and you’ll feel happy again thinking about the good times with  your pet. When a Pet Dies doesn’t talk down to children, instead it handles a difficult subject in a comfortable and understanding way. Fred Rogers understands children, which is clearly seen if you watched Mr. Rogers. When a Pet Dies never goes into detail about what occurs after death or anything religious. That can be discussed within your family. I recommend When a Pet Dies for both a pet and individual death. 

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Here’s my family’s dog, George, who recently passed away.

 

Wordless Wednesday: Mirror by Jeannie Baker

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mirrorMirror

Written & Illustrated by Jeannie Baker

Published by Candlewick on November 9, 2010
Genre/Topics: Wordless, Cultural
Ages: 6+, 48 pages 
 

Two stories and two cultures are told simultaneously in one book. The stories appear side by side as the reader turns the pages at the same time. Mirror follows a typical day of two boys on opposite sides of the world. The stories take place in Sydney, Australia, and Morocco, North Africa. An introduction is provided in English and Arabic at the start of each story. The boys awake, eat breakfast, and travel to town for errands. The left story takes place in Sydney, Australia, and the destination is a hardware store by car on roads. The right story takes place in Morocco, as the boy and his father travel by donkey on a trail to the market. The final pages display the family in Australia, with a new carpet bought on their travel and the family in Morocco, explores their new computer. The two families may appear different, but they mirror each other with common elements found in all families.

I highly enjoyed Mirror. This wordless picture book is a very unique idea how two stories are told at the same time. Mirror really provides the reader with an experience about each boy’s day in their culture. The book’s illustrations are amazing with detailed facial expressions, market foods, car license plates, animals on the trail, carpet designs, and even keyboard keys. You really feel that you are there with the families. The illustrations are photographs of collages. The detailed collages are made with many materials, such as sand, fabric, wool, tin, plastic, paint, clay, and vegetation. I read some criticism about Mirror starting it’s not easy as a read aloud in the classroom. True, it may be difficult to handle the extended pages so perhaps independent or partner reading is best. Besides, you need to examine closely to view all the details. Another criticism was that Mirror displayed cultural stereotypes. Mirror is a great book to introduce children to different lifestyles and cultures even though we share similar traits. I recommend Mirror for older ages to understand the concept and handle the book with care.

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Teaser Tuesday: Dog On It

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Teaser Tuesday is hosted on the blog Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  •  Grab your current read.
  • Open to a random page.
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences.
  • DO NOT INCLUDE SPOILERS
  • Share the title & author

dog

Dog On It: A Chet & Bernie Mystery
Written by Spencer Quinn

“The man was about Bernie’s height but not as broad; he had a goatee, which always caught my attention, and I was staring at it when his smell reached me, the very worse smell in the whole world: cat. The man in our driveway smelled of cat. “

- page 74

 

Weekly Quotation: Dr. Seuss

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“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”
- Dr. Seuss

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Texture

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This week’s photo challenge is texture. I decided to show different textures on a tree. There is both rough bark and fuzzy moss upon the tree.

 

Foto Friday: George the Gentle Giant

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This week is a special Foto Friday. My family’s dog, George, passed away this week. We called him ‘George the Gentle Giant’, since he was kind even though he was a large dog. He was a wonderful dog and will be missed. He’s now in a better place with no pain. I have many photos and great memories of our dog George.