Foto Friday: Waterfall

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Japanese Garden, Pt. Defiance Park
Tacoma, Washington, 2014

Book Review: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

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readyReady Player One
Written by Ernest Cline
Published by Broadway Books on June 5, 2012
Genre/Topics: Adult, Science Fiction, Dystopia
384 pages
 

The year is 2044 and the world isn’t a pleasant place. Extreme famine, war, homelessness, and energy shortages are just a few concerns. Teenager Wade Watts’ only escape is when he’s connected to the virtual world OASIS. When he’s in OASIS, Wade can be whomever he desires, attend high school virtually, form friendships, and most importantly is in a utopia-like world.

His poor living conditions may change when he learns about an OASIS contest to win billions of dollars. James Halliday, the founder of OASIS, creates a virtual treasure game to win the billions. The prize is far from an easy task to find. It is hidden within clues and puzzles. Halliday was obsessed with everything about the 1980s, so all the puzzles somehow connect to the 1980s. Wade masters all the arcade video games, movies, television shows, and anything about Halliday’s life growing up in the 1980s. Wade is the first to find a clue, but there are now challenges. He learns that some players are out to kill in order to win the prize and control the OASIS. The only way for Wade to survive is to continue playing the game. Is his 1980s knowledge enough to win? How does the real world connect to the virtual OASIS?

Ready Player One was a very fun and entertaining read! If you enjoy video games, movie and television trivia, and a look back into the 1980s then you’re sure to enjoy this book. I didn’t play video games, but the terms were easy to follow. The OASIS in 2044 really doesn’t seem that far away as today in 2014. We often hide in our own ‘worlds’ behind Facebook, constant web searching, dating sites, and texting to name just a few. There’s a balance between the real world and virtual world. Wade has this same problem in Ready Player One. Let this book remind you that it’s okay to unplug ourselves from the virtual world and enjoy each other in real time.

Wordless Wednesday: Sidewalk Circus by Paul Fleischman

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Sidewalk Circus

Written by Paul Fleischman

Illustrated by Kevin Hawkes

Published by Candlewick on May 8, 2007

Ages: 5+, 32 pages

Genre/Topics: Wordless, Circus

Ladies, gentlemen, boys, and girls The Garibaldi Circus is coming to town! There are many busy preparations for the circus, but if you look closely you may get a sneak peek. A young girl watches across the street at the bus stop as people prepare for the upcoming circus. The girl witnesses a tight rope walker who is actually a construction worker balancing pails. She sees clowns who are kids skateboarding into the market. There’s a sword swallower sitting in the dentist chair. A stilt walker balances on a ladder while painting. A dog’s shadow becomes a scary lion. The entire street ‘circus’ is viewed on the last pages. The girl boards the bus at the same time a boy sits at the bus stop to watch. What exciting things will you see at the circus pre-show?

Sidewalk Circus is an entertaining book that displays ordinary street events into an exciting show. I thought it was interesting that the girl was the only individual at the bus stop who noticed the street shows. Even though this is a wordless picture book, words appear on circus posters, shops, and billboards announcing the circus. The illustrations are bright, colorful, and show city details. I recommend Sidewalk Circus to help see the extraordinary in the otherwise ordinary daily events in your city.

Teaser Tuesday: 11/22/63

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I thought it would be fun to start Teaser Tuesdays. It is hosted on the blog Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  •  Grab your current read.
  • Open to a random page.
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences.
  • DO NOT INCLUDE SPOILERS
  • Share the title & author

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I just started Stephen King’s 11/22/63. So far I really enjoy the book. Here are my two ‘teaser’ sentences:

“Get in touch with your, you know feminine side. Look at me the way women look at other women when they’re judging age.”
- page 19

Weekly Quotation: Vincent van Gogh

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“I feel that there is nothing more truly artistic than to love people.”
- Vincent van Gogh

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Foto Friday: Purple Flowers

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Pt. Defiance Park, 2014
Tacoma, Washington

Book Review: Bunnicula by Deborah & James Howe

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bunniculaBunnicula: A Rabbit-tale of Mystery

Written by Deborah & James Howe

Illustrated by Allan Daniel

Published 1979

Ages: 6-9, 128 pages

Genre/Topics: Humor, Mystery

The fun and adventure begins when the Monroe family returns from the movie with a new family addition – a rabbit. The family agrees to name the bunny Bunnicula, since it was found at the movies while watching Dracula. However, two family members are hesitant about Bunnicula – Chester the cat and Harold the dog. We learn about Bunnicula from Harold’s perspective. Chester believes Bunnicula really is a vampire and with Harold’s reluctant help they discover more about Bunnicula. Bunnicula has fangs and stays awake at night. Is Bunnicula really a vampire? Humorous events occur as Chester is determined to prove that Bunnicula is a vampire.

I loved Bunnicula! I really did laugh out loud as Harold described the weird events happening in the house since Bunnicula arrived. The reader learns about Chester’s mischievous behavior and Harold’s family loyalty. The book is mysterious without being scary. Readers will be curious about Bunnicula and want to know more about Chester and Harold’s adventures. There are additional books in the Bunnicula series. I highly recommend Bunnicula for a fun read!